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New stream crossing signs highlight source waters

DANVILLE — Every stream flows somewhere, and new signs along stream crossings are helping Iowans learn which waters flow into their local lakes.

Near Lake Geode in Des Moines County, new signs along Cedar Creek announce that the stream feeds into the lake. It’s part of the watershed, the area of land that drains into a specific creek, river or lake. And at Geode, a larger community project is working to improve the lake’s water quality.

"We want to help people living in the area understand that using conservation practices to protect water quality in Cedar Creek will also benefit Lake Geode, since they are part of the same watershed," said Mary Beth Stevenson, a DNR watershed projects manager.

People have had a lot of interest in the project, according to Lake Geode Watershed Coordinator Caleb Waters.

“Since Lake Geode was drained last fall, we and our project partners have received numerous questions from residents asking how the lake will refill once the lake restoration project is complete,” Waters said.

In another watershed project, the DNR will also work with the City of Des Moines to place “Source of Easter Lake” signs along Yeader Creek and Magnolia Creek.

The signs join a number of creek name signs at stream crossings in a number of watersheds across the state, all designed to help Iowans gain a greater recognition and appreciation of their local waters.

“Every day we drive across a stream, creek or river and most of the time we don’t realize the name of the creek, where it starts or ends,” said Waters. “We believe these signs will create awareness linking the community to Cedar Creek and the watershed in which they live.”

Funding for the signs comes from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 319 funds through the Iowa DNR Watershed Improvement program. 

New stream crossing signs highlight source waters  |  Iowa DNR

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