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6 tips for soaking up more stormwater in your yard

6 tips for soaking up more stormwater in your yard

  • 4/20/2020 1:44:00 PM
  • View Count 1739
Not that long ago, Iowa consisted of nearly 80 percent prairie with plants and soil that could easily soak up stormwater with little to no runoff after heavy rains. Today, with drastic changes in land use, things have changed. With so many impervious surfaces (surfaces that shed water, such as roofs and concrete), runoff is forced quickly down storm drains and straight into local water bodies. Here are some ways to soak up more water in your yard to help prevent erosion and flooding in your lawn and home, as well a...
6 ways to help monarchs in your own backyard

6 ways to help monarchs in your own backyard

  • 7/5/2019 4:52:00 PM
  • View Count 6986
One of the most recognized pollinators, monarchs travel more than 3,000 miles each year to come visit Iowa for the summer. With declining numbers over the last decade, here are some ways you can help these beautiful orange and black butterflies:
Build Rain Gardens to Hold Water, Beautify Yards, Help Wildlife [Tutorial]

Build Rain Gardens to Hold Water, Beautify Yards, Help Wildlife [Tutorial]

  • 5/22/2015 10:54:00 AM
  • View Count 10869
While rain storms are natural, storm water runoff is not. Flowing from rooftops and surging out downspouts, across the yard, into the street and down the storm sewer untreated, rainfall is routed to the nearest stream or lake. Runoff is often polluted. In its rough and tumble downhill journey, rain picks up heavy metals, oils, fertilizers, soils, sediment, and pesticides.
Bee Beautiful – 5 Tips to Attract Pollinators to Your Backyard

Bee Beautiful – 5 Tips to Attract Pollinators to Your Backyard

  • 4/29/2015 10:29:00 AM
  • View Count 20015
One out of every three bites of food we eat relies on pollinators, mostly insects, to reproduce. Unfortunately, bees (colony and solitary), butterflies and moths, bats, birds and beetles are facing challenges due to habitat loss, disease, parasites and pesticides.