Learn about the DNR's COVID-19 response and how the current health emergency is impacting DNR facilities, services and events.
Search for a News Release
DNR News Releases

Learn to Hunt program opens registration for virtual Hunt Iowa Social hour

  • 11/3/2020 12:28:00 PM
  • View Count 488
  • Return

DES MOINES - The Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is offering a free virtual social hour to individuals who have little to no hunting experience or would like to find out more about hunting in Iowa.

“If you haven't hunted in a couple of years but would like to get back afield, or maybe never hunted but always wanted to learn more, this is the event for you.”  said Jamie Cook, program coordinator with the Iowa DNR.

Join the event online at 6:30 p.m., Nov. 19, for an evening discussing all things hunting with conservation groups, retailers, and staff with the Iowa DNR who will provide information on ways to get involved in hunting and increase your hunting knowledge and skills.

“This is a laid-back, family friendly event will showcase opportunities to get involved in other outdoor recreational pursuits such as shooting sports and fishing,” said Cook.

Participants will have the chance to listen to guest speakers, hear about places to hunt, ask questions to DNR staff and get to know other hunters across the state.

The course is geared for participants 16 and older. Those under 16 must have an adult register and participate in the course as well. Space online will be limited so register right way to ensure your spot.  The social will be held on Nov. 19 and will cover topics such as season basics, where to hunt, hunting regulations, and feature some great partners that can help connect you to the field. For more information and to begin the registration process, visit: 

Nov. 19: https://www.register-ed.com/events/view/163728

The program is provided through a partnership with Iowa Wildlife Federation, Pheasants Forever and the Iowa DNR. It is part of a national effort to recruit, retain and reactivate hunters due to the overall decline in hunting and outdoor recreation.

Share